Certificate in Planning, Organising, Motivation & Goal Setting

£60.00

This certificate covers the importance of the planning process for the team manager as well as giving some directives on the design of a team strategic plan. It also look at the important qualities of good organisation in team set-up. It look at team discipline as well as at the top-down and down-top feedback process. It also looks at motivation and goal setting and how they can add to the manager’s strengths.

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Description

Planning, Organising, Motivation & Goal Setting

Details:

4 REPs PointsThis module covers the importance of the planning process for the team manager as well as giving some directives on the design of a team strategic plan. It also look at the important qualities of good organization in team set-up. It look at team discipline as well as at the top-down and down-top feedback process. It also looks at motivation and goal setting and how they can add to the manager’s strengths.

Module introduction – 4 PDF documents
Resource notes
A total of 28 lectures in PDF format, available to download and print
3 multiple-choice activities
You will achieve 4 REPs Continued Professional Development (CPD) points upon completion of this module.

INTRODUCTION
In this module we look at a very important aspect of team planning and organisation. The team manager is seen as one whose job is to plan for team affairs in all its meanings. However a good manager will involve team coaches and backroom team as well as the players themselves in developing a sound strategic plan for a sports team.

Team Planning is a process for accomplishing aims and purposes for the management, the players and for the supporting personnel. In many ways it can be seen as a blue print of how the team will grow, develop and achieve and, as such, it should be seen to provide a road map of development over the period of management. It helps in deciding objectives both in quantitative and qualitative terms. It is setting out of goals on the basis of objectives and utilising the resources of the players and assistants to the full. Depending upon the sports, a plan can contain long range, intermediate range as well as short range but realistic objective. It is the framework within which the management and the team should or must operate.

As part of management organisation, there are many alternative types of management structure in use today. In this module we take each of the five main structures, and look at the advantages and disadvantages of each type. Controlling is one of the managerial functions like planning, organising, selecting and directing all matters relating to team preparation and performance.

Controlling is one of these important functions because it helps to check the errors and to take the corrective action so that deviation from standards are minimised and stated goals of the team or the club are achieved in a desired manner. We examine the range of control needed to be set –up by the manager for use with his or her work with the team.

The attention of the module turns to Motivation. It is a complex process that influences individuals to begin, pursue, and persist in an activity. Intrinsic motivation is self-fuelling over the long term because it is based on controllable feelings of enjoyment and competence; extrinsic motivation relies on external reenforcers from the social environment. Current theory views motivation as a cognitive process in which our behaviour is a direct result of how we think and process information about ourselves and the world. The one common thread in the many theories of motivation is that people are motivated to feel competent, worthy, and self-determining.

The next area we cover is goal-setting. Goals influence two important factors in sports. Firstly, how a performance is viewed and how a player or a team as a unit considers how they will perform. The aim of goal-setting is to effect and to govern performance efficacy. Thus, despite excellence in physiological conditioning and skill preparation, it is a player’s appraisal of what is to be done, how well he/she is prepared to do it, and whether he/she thinks it can or cannot be done, that affects the quality of a performance. This topic examines this aspect of the team preparation.

All sport team players, need and actually want firm boundaries to be set. It is human nature for players to seek out the boundaries. Players will push and push to try to figure out where the boundaries (between acceptable and unacceptable behaviour) are. Good team discipline is crucial to the overall success of the efforts of any team. Not only do disciplined teams perform well on the field, but, if teams are able to maintain good discipline both on and off the field, the overall sport experience is far more positive for all the people involved the team – players, coaches, administrators, parents, and even supporters.

In fact, maintaining team discipline is one of the biggest fears or challenges for beginner managers and coaches. Often, managers are lost or their coaching becomes ineffective because they are unable to maintain order and discipline with their team especially at training.

Also in this module we look at giving and receiving feedback. Feedback is the information provided either during or after an activity (training session or game) and which enables a manager, coach or player to assess how well an activity has been done. Feedback is regarded by many sports managers as the single most important factor in training; without it, a person does not know how well he or she is progressing. Some feedback is a natural consequence of performing an activity; athletes and player see and feel how well the activity is being accomplished.

However, the most effective feedback is often provided by an external observer (e.g. coach) or from some other objective source (e.g. a video camera). A good manager, coach or fitness trainer should always ensure that those being trained are getting high quality feedback.

Towards the end of this module we look at safety in training. At a training session the manager is ultimately responsible for the safety of the players in a squad. Creating a safe playing environment for the members of the team can significantly reduce the number and severity of injuries during training sessions, competitions and matches or games. This involves being conscious of the exercises they ask the players to complete. They must understand the function and use of each drill or activity. They must know if the exercise is part of the warm-up, the game, a conditioning activity or part of the cool-down. The exercises used by the coach should be dependent on why the coach is getting the squad to do them.

The golden rule in any session is to prepare the body, work it correctly and recover it afterwards.