Certificate in The Foundation Stage – Pre-School Athlete

£60.00

This certificate is devoted to coaching the pre-school athlete. It questions many old wives tales and explains the part played by physical activity in both physical and mental development. It also lays out a series of exercises which can be used with under 3 to to under 5 to ensure that their development is positive.

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Description

The Pre-School Athlete

Module 4 is devoted to coaching the pre-school athlete. It questions many old wives tales and explains the part played by physical activity in both physical and mental development. It also lays out a series of exercises which can be used with under 3 to to under 5 to ensure that their development is positive.

  • Module introduction – 4 PDF documents
  • Resource notes
  • A total of 25 lectures in PDF format, available to download and print
  • 11 workshop videos
  • 3 multiple-choice activities

You will achieve 4 REPs Continued Professional Development (CPD) points upon completion of this module.

GENERAL INTRODUCTION
This course content examines the pre-school athlete, environment, training and coaching. In order to understand the module, we begin with a short lecture on basic terms and definitions which are needed to understand the content of the lectures.

Over the years, the UK, American, Australian researchers into children’s development have led many government departments to set recommended guidelines regarding many aspects of the child’s life. Physical fitness guidelines are seen in many countries of the utmost importance. We look at some important guideline relating to physical activity for the child and teenager. In addition we examine the various environments where the pre-school child can play and exercise.

It is very important that the pre-school child is involved in organised physical activity on a regular daily basis. However, of even more importance, is the experience of free play. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, in order to develop socially, emotionally and cognitively, children need plenty of free, unstructured play – in other words, lots of old-fashioned free playtime and the more environments available to them, the better.

Every child is unique in his or her own way. Yet, there are certain similarities that children share with each other. With the help of many experts in the field, in this module we will look at a collection of “Growth Milestones” which are known as stages of development. The aim in presenting this information is to make your work as a coach somewhat easier.

Having the skills to run, jump, throw, pass, kick, strike and catch are not only important for games and activities at school and in sport but are needed in as life skills. These skills are also useful in building other skills that enable you to participate in a range of physical activities. The importance of movement skill learning at pre-school is one of the most important aims of a coach for young children in sport.

Childhood obesity has tripled in just 20 years. Also there is an increasing number of pre-school children showing developmental coordination delay (DCD) due to lack of movement experience in early years, which has inhibited neural development in the brain. 85% of brain development occurs in the first three years of life and the greatest influence on that development is quite simply movement. By being allowed to move around particularly on the floor, a baby will begin the process of ‘sensory integration’ ‘putting to sleep’ the primitive reflexes we are all born with and beginning to learn voluntary controlled movement patterns. Worrying statistics like some babies spending 600 hours in a ‘container’ during the first year of life must be addressed.

Preschool-age children who are inactive risk becoming overweight in the future. However those who coach pre-school children have much higher aims of the physical training. In this module we look at the type of training activities that are needed when coaching pre-school children.

Professor and physiotherapist Dr Carolyn Richardson, who’s spent 20 years researching children’s health says musculoskeletal health for children is a “huge problem”. She says by the age of six, children should have a well-developed strong healthy spine. “I fear it is all downhill from there, with lack of emphasis on good posture and lack of antigravity exercise, plus lack of cardio exercise too,” Carolyn says. “It’s far better to start young with antigravity exercise for the core muscles.” As she pointed out “prevention is far better than cure!” she says. Her recommendations suggested that children should look after their musculoskeletal health by stretching tall, spending time in bare feet on sandy or grass surfaces and playing games that include weight bearing like wheelbarrow races.